Types Of Braids Step By Step

Braids, buns, and twists!: step-by-step tutorials for 82, Braids, buns, and twists! and over one million other books are available for amazon kindle. learn more. Different styles of braids & their names | ehow, Different styles of braids & their names. hair braiding has long been a bonding tradition between girlfriends, sisters, mothers and daughters. it takes forever and it. Cornrow braids step by step tutorial how to part and, For free giveaways & weekly updates, stay connected by email! http://eepurl.com/am3kb buy my books, dvds, and t-shirts at http://www.howtoblackhairstore.

How to Draw Hair Braid Drawing

Curly hair photos - different types of braids - natural, Curly hair photos – different types of braids. curly hair photos – different types of braids. hey there! here you’ll discover some of the dozens of different. Cornrows 101 for beginners on all hair types - detailed, Www.worldofbraiding.com, www.hairextensionsandbeauty.com, info@worldofbraiding.com in this tutorial we show you the proper way to cornrow any hair type for. How to do fishtail or herringbone braids step by step | ehow, Fishtail braids, also known as herringbone braids, can look intimidating, but this step-by-step guide breaks down the process. a great option for medium to.

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Find the Best Shampoo for Curly, Ethnic, and African American Hair Types: Stop Dryness and Frizz :: An Review

Black or African American hair is different in texture than Caucasian or Non Ethnic Hair; yet, many individuals, all over the world, whether Black, brown, or white, have drier, curlier textured hair. The reason Black or African American hair care seems such a daunting task is because the hair care industry caters to Caucasian or non-curly textured hair. The ingredients in most shampoos specifically have been geared toward a specific clientele. Unfortunately, Black Hair Care shampoos for African American or Ethnic hair, which were spin offs of these products, mimicked these shampoo components, using cheap detergents, foaming agents, and feel good silicones and chemicals without giving African American, Ethnic and curly textured hair the actual ingredients it needs to be healthy. Different hair textures need different things. Black hair care only seems so impossible because no production company has truly researched and been willing to spend the additional dollars to give Black Hair what it needs. However, there are a few companies out there that make great shampoos for Black hair. Here’s a Guide on “What to Look for When Buying a Shampoo for African American, Black, or Biracial Hair.”

Step # 1 Assess the characteristics of your African American or Ethnic hair. You should look for a mild, moisturizing shampoo with a balanced pH value. The pH balance refers to the alkalinity or acidity of a particular product. A pH of 5 is near the Ph normal hair. A balanced pH value will help maintain the hair’s natural acidity level while giving shine and manageability to African American or Ethnic Hair. However, African American or Ethnic individuals often need shampoos with a slightly higher pH, so less acidity reaches the scalp and robs it of moisture.

Step #2: Make Quality Hair Care Product Purchasing Decisions. You get what you pay for, so try buying hair care shampoos, conditioners, and lotions that are natural. If not natural, look for shampoos that contain no sulfates, silicones, or glycols, because these are cheap foaming agents, hair coaters, and thickeners that strip Black hair and Ethnic hair of its natural oils.

Step #3: Bring Your Magnify Glass and Look at the Ingredient Labels. Look for shampoos that contain the following ingredients: Aloe Vera (light hair moisturizer for all hair types), Rosemary (hair growth stimulant, pH balancer, removes build up), Jojoba (moisturizing oil closest to normal skin), Amla ( natural oil that acts as a hair conditioner), Lemon (acts as a clarifier, adds shine, and improves manageability). Beauty 4 Ashes GodHead and Ojon shampoos work particularly well on African American hair as well as wavy and curly haired individuals. GodHead in particular works well, because it is loaded with essential and natural oils that add shine and bounce, while loosening and separating curly textured hairs. You can find their products online at wwwdiscoverb4acom.

Step #4: Buy a Shampoo that You are Comfortable Washing with at least Once Time per Week. If you use the correct product, you won’t have to have fear about washing your hair more often. Water is actually great for African American and Ethnic Hair. So, don’t dread shampooing that hair. With a great product, such as Beauty 4 Ashes Silky Smooth Shampoo or Ojon, your hair will actually grow more with more frequent washing.

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Black Hair and Alopecia :: An Review

Traction alopecia is a common form of black hair loss. While this type of alopecia is seen worldwide, and common to Sikh men and Japanese women due to their traditional hair styles, it is most widely seen in African-American women and men.

Alopecia’s  are believed to be the fifth most common dermatological complaint among Black people, with chemical and traction  alopecia’s the most common.Population studies show a prevalence of 17.1% in African schoolgirls and of 31.7% in women inflicted, with numbers steadily rising.

 There are 2 types of traction alopecia, marginal and non-marginal. Marginal traction is caused by appliances such as tight curlers and rollers, where the hair loss pattern reflects the use of these objects. Whereas a non-marginal pattern occurs created through effects like hair buns creating hair loss in the area where the bun actually sits. This type of alopecia for this reason is often seen in nurses.


Traction alopecia is mainly caused by damage to the dermal papilla and hair follicle, through steady pressure over time. Normally induced by various hair styling practices (e.g. use of braids, hair rollers, weaves, twists, locks, or “cornrows”) Cornrows are most frequently blamed due to the repeated steady high pressure overtime.

The pulling causes hair to loosen from its roots; however, hair loss occurs secondary to follicular inflammation and atrophy. Often the loss is symmetric and along the hairline adjacent to the temples.

Traction Alopecia can also occur due to over processing of the hair.Chemical treatments which use products such as dyes, bleaches, or relaxers can damage the keratin structure rendering the hair extremely fragile.  The hair then falls out very easily with brushing or combing.

A form of scarring alopecia also may occur in post-menopausal women, associated with inflammation of hair follicles and subsequent scarring


Individuals usually complain of itching and dandruff at first which is usually followed by patchy areas of hair loss. Other signs may include:

  • Scalp shows signs inflammation with scales and pustules.
  • Symmetrical hair loss.


In the initial stages, this hair loss is reversible but with prolonged traction,once scaring occurs and hair follicles are damaged beyond repair, alopecia can be permanent.

Hair styles that put unnecessary strain on the hair root must be changed for looser, less traumatic hair styles.

If you are going to wear your hair braided then it is advisable request that your stylist does not pull or plait them tightly and likewise hairdressers specialising in braids and locks should warn their clients of the possible dangers of prolonged tension.

To summarise the key to stopping traction alopecia is detecting it early. African-American women, who suspect they may be vulnerable to traction alopecia should change their hair styles and seek professional advice. 

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Black Hair Care: Tips for Transitioning From Relaxed to Natural Hair :: An Review

Despite all the buzz to the contrary on natural black haircare, transitioning from relaxed to natural hair does not have to be traumatizing. If you have worn your hair permed or relaxed for many years, look at the transitioning stage as a formal re-introduction to the natural hair your momma gave you!

Every woman who decides to go natural carries a unique blueprint that is her natural tresses. No two heads are alike. Embrace the fact that what you have is beautiful, not to mention a head turner.

Do You Know Your Curl Pattern?

Every person is born with a hair type that is all their own. Stylist Andre Walker, created a system for classifying specific hair types or patterns.

Curly/kinky is Type 4A, 4B or 4C. Type 4 can resemble small spirals the diameter of a crochet needle, or be tightly coiled. Curly/kinky is at the greatest risk for breakage because of the curl pattern and needs consistent moisture.

Curly is Type 3A, 3B or 3C and can range from loose ringlets to slightly more tightly defined, spiral curls the size of a pen.

Type 2 is wavy hair, with variations ranging from 2A to 2B to 2C – with 2C being the most wavy within the 2 category of wavy hair.

Straight hair is classified as Type 1. Straight is the strongest of all hair types and is generally harder to hold a curl.

Many of us may have various curl patterns on our head! The crown could be 3b while the nape of the neck is 4a for example. There are a growing number of people who don’t subscribe to Andre Walker’s curl pattern classification because they feel that it is too restricting, or that it perpetuates the stereotype of the “good hair”, “bad hair” mentality.

We think that it is a useful tool to help us to understand our hair better. The system was not meant to reinforce old school negative connotations.

Transition Style Plan: Before The “The Big Chop”

Some women are tempted to cut all their relaxed hair off when deciding to go natural. Others cut as much of the permed or relaxed portion of their hair off as possible and work on nurturing their new growth – or the new hair that grew in after the perm. It is best to plan the big chop only after you have an idea of how you want to look and what you will look like with short hair.

You know yourself better than anyone and can envision what you will look like with a shorter style than you may be used to wearing. You can also talk with a stylist to get a second opinion based on the shape of your face. Remember, you can always enhance your short style with plenty of hair accessories – medium- to large-sized earrings, headbands, and colorful scarves. Your hair will grow healthy, beautiful, and stronger than ever.

Transition Style Plan: Without “The Big Chop”

Not everyone feels comfortable with cutting their hair off in order to transition completely over to a natural hairstyle. A slower crawl towards natural hair can be accomplished with twists, braids, flat twists or other styles that allows you to keep your hair length during the transition process. If you choose to keep your relaxed hair while your natural hair is growing out, be sure to trim the ends and deep condition regularly as the line of demarcation between the natural and relaxed hair is weak and prone to breakage.


One huge mistake that many women make while taking care of their natural hair is overloading it with lots of grease or oils. You may feel that this is the best way to keep your hair from being dry and frizzy. This is only partially true. Our natural hair needs lots of natural moisture – lightweight, lightly applied oils – to lock in that moisture to our hair and scalp. The best are natural moisturizers that get absorbed into our hair instead of laying on top of our hair like hair grease. Hair grease with petroleum and mineral oils prevent moisture from absorbing into the hair shaft. Some better alternatives include:

• Coconut oil

• Shea butter

• Jojoba oil

Avoid products with mineral oil, silicone, or petroleum which just sit on top of the hair. Remember that you need moisture that penetrates the hair shaft which will keep your hair properly moisturized. This not only protects your hair from breakage, but helps to bring out your natural curl pattern.

Always Protect Your Hair When Sleeping

Sleeping provides a special challenge to natural hair if you do not prepare and protect it. You want to avoid matting, tangling and breakage as much as possible. Sleep on satin pillowcases or use a satin cap. You can also twist or braid your hair in big sections before sleeping.

The transition over to natural black hair care is easier than you think and well worth the effort for healthy, head turning natural hair.

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Beautiful, Elegant and Classy Black Hair Wedding Styles :: An Review

As the bride, looking beautiful is no longer a question. You certainly have to be the center of everyone’s attention, as that is your big day! Having the right wedding hair style is the key to that. And for this very special day, elegant black wedding hair styles are the perfect choice. Styling your hair the best possible way is important even if you are wearing a veil. More than the makeup, the wedding dress, your hair is going to be one of the things people will see. By knowing and understanding what your specific hair type is, and choosing the best look that perfectly suits your features, achieving a flattering hair style won’t be a problem.

Do the black wedding hair styles that follow, walk with a beautiful smile and be the most beautiful woman to walk down the aisle.

Flip is a hair style that can be done if your hair hangs down to your earlobes, a hair style that is both practical and charming. It also never goes out of fashion and is very easy to maintain. A sleek flip can be done with a simple touch of pomade. This is a good choice if you want to look smart and simple. A razor cut flip is a very dressy look that makes the ends of the hair flip perfectly. It is ideal for giving the hair a light and textured look.

Afro is another wedding hair style that is chic and stylish. Afro provides women with lots of option as it can be done in varied ways. An elegant style with an edge, for example, is a textured piece of afro which is parted to the side, pinned back with a flower — very stylish, and feminine.

A basket weave is a more intricate wedding hair style. Doing this hair style might need more time but it’s definitely worth it. Hair would be styled with slim single braids that are woven tightly on the crown of the head in a crisscross pattern. For longer hair, the remaining strands can be pulled into some more braids which can be done as a unique twist, or a curl for a gently soft wave.

What can be more elegant than an up-do? This is one of the most common black wedding hair styles, opted by many as it is clean and easily controlled.

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7 Simple Steps to Grow Black Hair Long and Strong :: An Review

How to grow black hair! This has been a topic discussed by many experts and in this article I want to disuses the simple ways you can grow an African mane long and strong! Black hair is just like any other hair; the only thing it has against it is that it is dryer than other types of hairs. This means special attention needs to be given to it if you wish to see fast growth.

There are a few facts you need to know about growing healthily African hair fast.

- Black hair grows at a rate of one half to one inch a month -this is an average only and the number can be improved upon.

- African tresses are dry tresses and as such you need to take certain steps to keep it moisturized if you want your tresses to grow.

- African hair like other hair is dead, so there is not much you can do with the dead parts, but there is lots you can do to grow a healthy African mane at the root level

Here are 7 tips that will show you how to grow black hair long and strong:

1. If you want to grow African hair long and strong, you need to keep the scalp moisturized, the best thing to use is an oil called Mira oil for the simple fact that it sets your sebum (natural oils) to an optimal level that helps grow African hair

2. Avoid relaxers and perms on your mane -these not only damage your mane, they will also poison the scalp thereby preventing your mane from growing fast. Keep your tresses natural when trying to grow it fast.

3. Avoid straighten your hair as it will dry the scalp and hair out even further, making your tresses even more susceptible to breakages and damage

4. Wear loose hairstyles as they do not pull and tug at your hair and weaken your tresses at the root level. Braids are good for growing black hair because they allow your tresses a chance to breathe and be at ease which helps African hair grow.

5. Keep your hair conditioned, again use a good herbal oil like Mira oil, a deep oil treatment will stimulate the hair follicles and allow your mane to grow at a faster rate. Use Mira oil for fast black hair growth, the oil will prevent breakages as well as promote hair growth. A deep conditioner will not only repair your mane, it will also seal in moisture.

6. To grow black hair long, shampoo your hair at least once every four days and use natural shampoo that do not strip away sebum from your scalp and hair. You need to keep your scalp and tresses clean to allow healthy African hair growth.

7. Get a scalp massage with a good herbal oil, the massage together with oil will stimulate blood flow to the scalp and allow healthy growth

If you follow these simple steps you will grow long black hair and you will never have to worry about your hair breaking or falling out again.

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